Mid-Atlantic Eye Physicians

Mid-Atlantic Eye Physicians

Friday, 18 August 2017 16:02

How to Safely Watch An Eclipse

Looking directly at the sun during most parts of an eclipse can permanently damage your vision or blind you. But there are easy ways to view a solar eclipse safely.

Thursday, 16 April 2015 15:19

Minimize Spring Allergies With These 5 Tips

This spring may be extra irritating for allergy sufferers, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC). After a long, wet and cold winter, spring's pollen counts may be higher than usual. Unfortunately, more than 40 million Americans who struggle with seasonal allergies could find their eyes are redder, itchier and more watery than normal. Even those who have never had spring allergies before may be dealing with runny noses and itchy eyes. Allergy medicine, from over-the-counter products to prescription drugs, can offer relief. Here are five other steps you can take to minimize the misery of spring allergies:

1. Wear sunglasses or eyeglasses whenever possible to protect your eyes from pollen.

2. Keep windows at home and in the car closed so pollen doesn't blow in.

3. Remove your jacket, hat and shoes as soon as you enter the house to avoid tracking pollen inside. Also, don't hang laundry outside to dry.

4. Shower before bed to remove pollen from skin and hair.

5. Monitor the pollen count each day (either online or through your local weather forecast). Try to spend less time outside when those counts are very high.

Sunday, 01 March 2015 15:17

March is Workplace Eye Wellness Month

Each year, 300,000 Americans visit the emergency room to treat a workplace eye injury.  A significant portion of eye injuries occur in manufacturing, construction and mining, industries which are experiencing recent job growth.

During Workplace Eye Wellness Month in March, the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Mid Atlantic Eye Physicians is reminding employers and workers in these fields about the importance of wearing eye protection.


The Academy's public education website EyeSmart® provides the following tips for avoiding eye injuries at work:

 

  • Wear protective eyewear whenever there is a chance of eye injury such as anywhere there may be flying debris, falling objects, chemicals and intense light and heat. This is particularly true of workers involved in welding. Among welders, their assistants, and nearby workers, UV radiation burns (welder's flash) routinely damage workers' eyes and surrounding tissue.
  • Make sure your eye protection is American National Standards Institute (ANSI)-approved, OSHA compliant, and is appropriate for the hazards in your workplace. If you are working in an area that has particles, flying objects or dust, you must at least wear safety glasses with side protection (side shields). If you are working with chemicals, you should wear goggles. If you are working near hazardous radiation (welding, lasers or fiber optics) you must use special-purpose safety glasses, goggles, face shields or helmets designed for that task.
Tuesday, 03 February 2015 15:15

Mid Atlantic Welcomes New Ophthalmologist

Please join us in welcoming our newest ophthalmologist Willard L. McCloud, Jr., M.D.

Dr. McCloud is a native of Winston Salem, NC and a graduate of Howard University in Washington, D.C and Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee. He completed his Ophthalmology residency at Tuskegee Veterans Administration Medical Center in Tuskegee, Alabama and has been in private practice since 1981 in Hampton, Virginia and Winston Salem.

Dr. McCloud is most proud of his work with the non-profit Winston Salem Industries for the Blind. The organization works to provide jobs for the visually impaired.

Dr. McCloud enjoys container gardening, and spending time with his two grandchildren. He is no stranger to the South Hill, Virginia area as his wife's family resides here. Dr. McCloud looks forward to serving the needs of Mid Atlantic's patients in both Roanoke Rapids and South Hill.

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a deterioration or breakdown of the eye's macula. The macula is a small area in the retina — the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye. The macula is the part of the retina that is responsible for your central vision, allowing you to see fine details clearly.

Many older people develop macular degeneration as part of the body's natural aging process. There are different kinds of macular problems, but the most common is age-related macular degeneration.

With macular degeneration, you may have symptoms such as blurriness, dark areas or distortion in your central vision, and perhaps permanent loss of your central vision. It usually does not affect your side, or peripheral vision.

For example, with advanced macular degeneration, you could see the outline of a clock, yet may not be able to see the hands of the clock to tell what time it is.

If this sounds all too familiar its time for a comprehensive eye exam.

The physicians at Mid Atlantic Eye Physicians are here to help guide you every step of the way. Call today for an appointment and be sure to tell our staff that you have some of these symptoms.

Wednesday, 29 October 2014 15:11

Diabetic Eye Month

Diabetes is a disease that affects the body's ability to produce or use insulin effectively to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. Although glucose is an important source of energy for the body's cells, too much glucose in the blood for a long time can cause damage in many parts of the body, including the heart, kidneys, blood vessels and the small blood vessels in the eyes.

When the blood vessels in the eye's retina (the light sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye) swell, leak or close off completely — or if abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina — it is called diabetic retinopathy.

People who are at greater risk of developing diabetic retinopathy are those who have diabetes or poor blood sugar control, women who are pregnant, and people with high blood pressure, high blood lipids or both. Also, people who are from certain ethnic groups, such as African-Americans, Hispanics and Native Americans, are more likely to develop diabetic retinopathy. In fact, a new study confirms that diabetes is a top risk factor for vision loss among Hispanics.

Something to remember: diabetes can cause vision in your eyes to change even if you do not have retinopathy. If your blood sugar levels change quickly, it can affect the shape of your eye's lens, causing blurry vision, which goes back to normal after your blood sugar stabilizes.

Did you know there is also a link between diabetes and cataracts? Permanent blurring of  vision due to cataracts can also result from changes to the lens due to excess blood sugar. Cataract surgery may be necessary to remove lenses that are clouded by the effects of diabetes and replace them with clear intraocular lenses (IOLs) to restore clear vision. Maintaining good control of your blood sugar helps reduce episodes of temporary blurred vision and prevent the permanent clouding of the lens that would require surgery to correct.

Learn more about diabetic retinopathy and how to save your sight.

Monday, 30 June 2014 14:48

Fireworks Eye Safety

Overall, more than 9,000 fireworks injuries happen each year on average in the United States, with roughly 1 in 8 fireworks injuries harming the eyes, according to the most recent report from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Injuries include burns, lacerations, abrasions, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage, and ruptured eyeballs. Even sparklers can burn more than 1,000 degrees hotter than the boiling point of water The physicians at Mid Atlantic Eye remind people that fireworks should not be thought of as toys, but devices that can cause third-degree burns. This is why people must be vigilant and take precautions to avoid the risk of serious eye injury.

Fireworks Safety Tips

The Academy of Ophthalmology advises that the best way to avoid a potentially blinding fireworks injury is by attending a professional public fireworks show rather than purchasing fireworks for home use.

For those who attend professional fireworks displays and/or live in communities surrounding the shows:

Respect safety barriers at fireworks shows and view fireworks from at least 500 feet away.

Do not touch unexploded fireworks; instead, immediately contact local fire or police departments to help.

For those who decide to purchase consumer fireworks because they live in states where they are legal, the Academy recommends the following safety tips to prevent eye injuries:

Never let children play with fireworks of any type, even sparklers.

Adults handling fireworks should always wear protective eyewear that meets the parameters set by the American National Standards Institute and ensure that all bystanders are also wearing eye protection.

Leave the lighting of professional-grade fireworks to trained pyrotechnicians.

What to do for a fireworks eye injury

If an eye injury from fireworks occurs, remember:

Seek medical attention immediately.

Do not rub your eyes.

Do not rinse your eyes.

Do not apply pressure.

Do not remove any objects that are stuck in the eye.

Do not apply ointments or take any blood-thinning pain medications such as aspirin or ibuprofen.

Monday, 21 April 2014 14:46

April is Sports Injury Awareness Month

This month the staff at Mid Atlantic Eye Physicians reminds you of the dangers associated with sports and recreation this time of year.  Tens of thousands of sports and recreation-related eye injuries occur each year. The good news is that 90 percent of serious eye injuries are preventable by using something as simple as protective eyewear.

High-Risk Sports

For all age groups, sports-related eye injuries occur most frequently in baseball, basketball and racquet sports.

Boxing and full-contact martial arts pose an extremely high risk of serious and even blinding eye injuries. There is no satisfactory eye protection for boxing, although thumbless gloves may reduce the number of boxing eye injuries.

In baseball, ice hockey and men's lacrosse, a helmet with a polycarbonate (an especially strong, shatterproof, lightweight plastic) face mask or wire shield should be worn at all times. It is important that hockey face masks be approved by the Hockey Equipment Certification Council or the Canadian Standards Association (CSA).

Protective eyewear with polycarbonate lenses should be worn for sports such as basketball, racquet sports, soccer and field hockey. Choose eye protectors that have been tested to meet the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards or that pass the CSA racquet sports standard. See the EyeSmart Protective Eyewear page for additional details.

If you already have reduced vision in one eye, consider the risks of injuring the stronger eye before participating in contact or racquet sports, which pose a higher risk of eye injury. Check with your ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) to see if appropriate eye protection is available and whether or not participating in contact or racquet sports is advised.

Other Risky Leisure Activities

While sports account for a particularly high number of eye injuries, they are by no means the only hobby that poses a risk to your sight. According to physicians surveyed for the 2008 Eye Injury Snapshot conducted by the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the American Society of Ocular Trauma, more than 40 percent of patients treated for eye injuries sustained at home were involved in home repairs, yard work, cleaning and cooking. Use common sense and err on the side of caution, whatever the activity.

  • Consider the risk of flying debris or other objects during activities and wear appropriate eye protection.
  • Remember that eyeglasses aren't sufficient protection.
  • Be careful during activities or games involving projectiles and other sharp objects that could create injury if in contact with the eye. For example, the U.S. Eye Injury Registry indicates that fishing is the number one cause of sports-related eye injuries.
  • If you wear contacts or eyeglasses, pack a back-up form of vision correction during bike trips or other activities where you could lose or shatter a lens.

If an eye injury occurs, see an ophthalmologist or go to the emergency room immediately, even if the eye injury appears minor. Delaying medical attention can result in permanent vision loss or blindness.

Source:  http://www.geteyesmart.org/eyesmart/living/sports.cfm

Tuesday, 04 March 2014 14:43

Eye Injuries At Work

March is Workplace Eye Wellness Month at Mid Atlantic Eye Physicians in Roanoke Rapids.

About 300,000 people visit the emergency room each year due to workplace eye injuries.

Out of all eye injuries sustained on the job, 40 percent happen in the fields of manufacturing, construction and mining, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The physicians at Mid Atlantic Eye Physicians believe that workers and employers should be diligent when it comes to eye protection.

Watch Out for Eye Dangers

Common causes for eye injuries are:

  • Flying objects (bits of metal, glass);
  • Tools;
  • Particles;
  • Chemicals;
  • Any combination of these or other hazards.

Protecting Your Eyes

There are three things you can do to help prevent an eye injury:

  • Know the eye safety dangers at work.
  • Eliminate hazards before starting work. Use machine guarding, work screens or other engineering controls.
  • Use proper eye protection.

Wear protective eyewear whenever there is a chance of eye injury. Anyone working in or passing through areas that pose eye hazards should wear protective eyewear. This is particularly true of workers involved in welding, which poses a high risk of on-the-job eye injury.

Always be sure your eye safety wear is OSHA-compliant

Tuesday, 18 February 2014 14:41

Facts about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a deterioration or breakdown of the eye's macula. The macula is a small area in the retina — the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye. The macula is the part of the retina that is responsible for your central vision, allowing you to see fine details clearly.

Many older people develop macular degeneration as part of the body's natural aging process. There are different kinds of macular problems, but the most common is age-related macular degeneration.

With macular degeneration, you may have symptoms such as blurriness, dark areas or distortion in your central vision, and perhaps permanent loss of your central vision. It usually does not affect your side, or peripheral vision.

For example, with advanced macular degeneration, you could see the outline of a clock, yet may not be able to see the hands of the clock to tell what time it is.

If this sounds all too familiar its time for a comprehensive eye exam.

The physicians at Mid Atlantic Eye Physicians are here to help guide you every step of the way. Call today for an appointment and be sure to tell our staff that you have some of these symptoms.

Page 1 of 2